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The Stream

News/Business. Wajahat Ali. Powered by social media, guests discuss untold stories, news and issues from across America. (CC) (Stereo)

DURATION
00:31:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel v107

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Georgia 5, Texas 2, Don 2, Us 2, Mccarthy 1, Shula 1, Christopher 1, Kathy 1, Newton 1, Stronium 1, Bible 1, Purdham 1, United States 1, U.n. 1, Lai Galileo 1, Malcolm Web 1, Jeffrey 1, Robidium 1, Syria 1, Congo 1,
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  Al Jazeera America    The Stream    News/Business. Wajahat Ali. Powered by social media,  
   guests discuss untold stories, news and issues from across...  

    August 28, 2013
    5:30 - 6:01am EDT  

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the confidence of businesses and consumers. they pull prospects may depend on it. al jazeera, new delhi. >> and just a quick reminder you can keep up to date with all the news on our website, the address al jazeera.com.
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park. yarlz continues after this. al jazeera will continue aftert.
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g102 2 with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot
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you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." >> welcome back, we're talking about texas science textbooks and whether they should leave the door open to talk about flaws in evolution. kathy i want to go to you. we're talking about texas textbooks here. what is their broader influence, why should people in colorado or anywhere else care? >> there's a reason we said don't mess with textbooks, not don't mess with texas. that's because texas is the largest consumer of textbooks in the country and when you're in this business you want to sell as many texas books as possible. science perpetually books is paramount concern for many
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publishers and has happened for decades the books that are adopted here in texas then get pedaled around the rest of the cup because it's very expensive to change them. and folks don't even realize it but in california they figured it out and they introduced a bill that said they would ban texas textbooks, it got so bad, texas has such a bad representation of politicizing, experts in the subject matter to get what's right in the classrooms. >> our community has picked up about that point on politics. will says creationism should not be taught as social studies. it is a political movement or an american religious movement that should be in the upper levels. christopher says, politics is gone the way of good reform. speaking of politics 2009 and 2010, texas had standards that down played the role that
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slavery caused the civil war and exaggerated the founding fathers and suggested the witch hunts by senator mccarthy and the house unamerican activities were justified. so don got to go with you about that, how much are politics playing a role in undercutting if you will evolution and promoting creationism? >> that's the whole point. fordham institute did a study of science standards all across the country, they just came up with a report a year and a half ago and updated it and they said that texas standards were exemplary. the week after we adopted those standards however, science magazine, american association for the advancement of science reported that new science standards for texas schools strike a major blow to the teaching of evolution. they haven't been challenged in court by trigger happy evolution is. all standards are good standards in our schools, there is no
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creationism being put into the books. all it is is science and challenging ef pollution to come up with good explanation for the fossil record and the development of the cell that's it. to me that's the major below. i think these textbooks could be the final below. the evidence, the students could say is this all the evidence they have? the evident is incredibly weak forthing cell the gaps in the fossil record and the stays is. i'm looking forward to -- >> what is wrong with pungt weighted ewill up rum? -- punctuated equilibrium? let me point out as a science educator, what we're thinking about, you don't need the world's foremost
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authority on paleontology or microbiology. what we're talking about is fundamental. it's before newton's laws. it's green plants. it's fundamental. here's the idea. we humans especially in the developed world work in organizations that are run from the top down. for example in the united states we have a president. evolution doesn't work that way. it's not top-down. evolution is bottom-up. so as the saying goes, nature has its bad designs eaten by its good designs. that's an aphorism. so i'm concerned that your other guests have misapprehension -- they don't grasp this middle idea, which is plild school at the highest. it's sort of elementary evolution. you don't need to go to extraordinary experts around the world. and i want you all when you get a chance to explain to us on the
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science side, how you reckon the age of the earth, how you reckon the finding of fossil -- in this one example dinosaur bones. how you get to fit with your world view and finally really georgia -- >> we'll get georgia to address arabia for that. ♪
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i'm not only in the universe, i'm in the stream. >> welcome back. i want to go straight out to georgia purdham. georgia if you could address bill's two questions he had before the break. how do you reconcile the age of the earth and fossils and secondly you're a christian and you are a scientist. do you think evolution and creationism can be taught side by side? >> let me address the first question. it's not about fitting the world view into my science, bill nye is using his world view to understanding the evidence and i'm using my world view to understand the evidence. he talked a lot about gaps, there are no gaps. again it's completely consistent with a creation world view with
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a biblical creation world view. like you say i'm is a scientist so i look at dna, i study genes all that information and what i see is absolutely consistent with a biblical creation view. and so it's not about fitting as i explained earlier about the age of the earth and the fossils, we explain the fossils as a result of noah's flood, a catastrophic deluge and you would expect to find all these dead things buried in rock layers all over the earth and guess what that's what you see as a result of the flood. observational science that we study today is consistent with the biblical world view. i'm not an advocate -- >> so your claim -- >> i'm not an advocate -- let me address the second question. i'm not an advocate to teach creationism in the public schools. i have a daughter in public schools. i believe it is my job to teach her the truth starting with the bible.
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so i see full well what she's learning and i teach her about the problems with that. and i have no issues with the -- in my opinion like kathy said earlier there is so much science that needs to be taught to our kids so why don't we focus on the good observational science that we're doing every day and leave the historical science out of it. >> whoa whoa. that's not okay to use my words and deny science. >> it's nonsensical to us on our side. so hang on. so your claim is that for example, if i find feather dinosaur fossils in china, those were put there during a primordial flood that happened just ten centuries ago, that's your -- i mean 10,000 years ago? that's your claim? >> talking about 4,000 years ago, yes. >> so at the same time is your
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claim is, stronium and robidium, you can tell one with a mass spectrometer, those clocks were set 10,000 years ago, and when i observe light 10,000 years ago those were put there, that's your claim 87? >> well data is based on assumptions of the past. you don't know because you weren't there. >> no i wasn't there but i'm pretty sure we had a civil war. i'm pretty sure we had isaac newton, i'm pretty sure we had gal lai galileo. >> we're not going to get this solved today or any time soon but we want to thank all of our guests, bill, don, ca have i and georgia. thank you.
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bill, sit tight, we want to leave time for questions from our viewers outside of the topic today. waj, at a it away. >> what are the best ways to make science relatable and interesting to kids and adults? >> i say just mess around. i say this all the time. explore. when you explore, whether it's your baking soda and vinegar and a balloon or your backyard under threat of climate change fire right now, that's an assertion, under threat of fire is yosemite national park, you'll have two things when you explore. you'll make discoveries of some sort. your backyard you'll almost find a type of insect you've never seen before and the other thing is you'll have an adventure. so go out there and look around. every day you will learn something. >> bill, speak going fires we have about 30 seconds left.
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here's jeffrey, do you think wildfires can speed up global warming? >> well, there's a lot of studies about the effect of soot. soot apparently is you have two problems. you have carbon dioxide being produced and soot also darkens snow fields which make them soak up more sunlight which make them melt more. everybody is talking about the water supply in san franciscan but soon in coming months there will be no way to hold the snow pack and that will be further trouble in that area. >> all right that is all the time we have. again our thanks to don, caity georgia and of course bill nye, the science guy. thank you for taking part in our
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. >> this is al jazeera. hello, and welcome to the news hour. here with your top stories. as weapon inspectors resume their mission, britain says lit try to put a draft resolution on syria to the u.n. security council. a series of bomb attack attacksq have killed at least zero people and injured more than 100. >> i'm malcolm web, in the democratic republic of congo, where soldiers and their families are buries those killed.

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